Tag Archives: Young Germany blogger

The long road to freedom and democracy

Mock coffins of Egyptians who died in clashes with security forces earlier in the month are placed in the street of the Egyptian Parliament and Prime Minister’s office, as some protesters continue a sit-in there and in Tahrir square one day before the run-off in the first round of the parliamentary elections, Cairo, Egypt, 04 December 2011. Photo: picture alliance / © dpa

Mock coffins of Egyptians who died in clashes with security forces earlier in the month are placed in the street of the Egyptian Parliament and Prime Minister’s office, as some protesters continue a sit-in there and in Tahrir square one day before the run-off in the first round of the parliamentary elections, Cairo, Egypt, 04 December 2011. Photo: picture alliance / © dpa

Egypt’s Tahrir Square a few weekends ago was not full of scenes of jubilation, but rather those of screams, tears, blood and violent clashes between demonstrators and police. More than 1,800 young Egyptians were injured and the violence claimed 42 people across the country according to Egyptian officials.

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The Withhold: thoughts on Egyptian-European collaboration

The Lotus Flower Tower, Aswan, Egypt located near Aswan High Dam, a memorial monument to the dam by Russian sculptor Ernst Neizvestny, built to celebrate Soviet-Egyptian collaboration on the project, Photo: (cc) flickr user Courtney Collison

Egypt’s going through a critical phase in its history that will surely affect its, as well as the whole world’s, face. Egypt is infectious. Anything that happens here will take the Middle East, the backyard of Europe. The examples for this in history are many. 1 in 4 Arabs lives in Egypt. The importance of Egypt cannot be sufficiently underlined.

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Before we forget!

Cairo at night as seen from the Cairo Tower on al-Gazirah, an island in the Nile River, Photo: (cc) flickr user Andrew Griffith

Cairo at night as seen from the Cairo Tower on al-Gazirah, an island in the Nile River, Photo: (cc) flickr user Andrew Griffith

“But we don’t hear anything about your country anymore. We thought everything’s alright and that your demands were met once Mubarak was gone. The situation has gone back to normal. Right,” asked the German tour guide after he discovered I’m Egyptian while he was giving us a night tour in the city of Osnabrueck.

I believe that not only he and his fellow Germans, but people from other countries and nationalities as well, share this perspective.  I have to admit that I’ve been hearing such comments for at least two months now,  which came as no surprise.

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Locked out of prison: The friends of Mohamed Radwan

Egyptian-US engineer Mohamed Radwan (c) speaks to the media after he and his parents met with Egypt's Foreign Minister Nabil Elaraby in Cairo April 3. Radwan was released April 1 after a week in detention in Syria for filming last week's protests in Damascus with a mobile phone. Radwan had been working in Syria for his father's company. Photo: picture alliance / © dpa.

Egyptian-US engineer Mohamed Radwan (c) speaks to the media after he and his parents met with Egypt's Foreign Minister Nabil Elaraby in Cairo April 3. Radwan was released April 1 after a week in detention in Syria for filming last week's protests in Damascus with a mobile phone. Radwan had been working in Syria for his father's company. Photo: picture alliance / © dpa.

I had returned home from the doctor’s clinic on Saturday evening fidgeting with anxiety. My surgery was scheduled for the next day, and naturally my mind started contemplating the results. If all goes well I should be alive and in a better condition than I am in now. If not … Well, I didn’t want to dwell on the possibilities.

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Paying the price for our tyrants

A young man mourns his brother killed during the uprising against Lybian leader Gadhafi in Benghazi, Libya, March 12, 2011. Photo: (c) picture alliance / abaca

A young man mourns his brother killed during the uprising against Lybian leader Gadhafi in Benghazi, Libya, March 12, 2011. Photo: (c) picture alliance / abaca

“He should have seen it coming” was a comment I heard from a news anchor about Libyan president tyrant Mommar Gaddafi  after the U.N. voted Thursday, March 18 to approve the resolution “to protect civilians and civilian populated areas under threat of attack” – that is from an attack by their own president. The resolution, sponsored by the United Kingdom, France, Lebanon and the United States, passed with an abstention from Germany.

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On becoming politically literate

Egyptians queue to cast their vote during a national referendum March 19, 2011 at a school in Cairo. Egyptians flocked to the polls on Saturday in a historic referendum on changes to the constitution, amendments proposed by a judicial committee formed by the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, Photo: (c) picture alliance / ZUMA Press

Egyptians queue to cast their vote during a national referendum March 19, 2011 at a school in Cairo. Egyptians flocked to the polls on Saturday in a historic referendum on changes to the constitution proposed by a judicial committee formed by the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, Photo: (c) picture alliance / ZUMA Press

Choices have consequences. It’s a natural law that can’t be argued, but all too often someone is not willing to take responsibility for his or her choices. The previous Egyptian government dominated the decision making process. Whether the decisions they reached were right or wrong, it was we the citizens who suffered their consequences, even though we didn’t chose the government or needless to say actually participate in its decision making. In return, instead of taking matters into our own hands we used to blame the government for its bad decisions. AND THIS WENT ON AND ON UNTIL WE CHANGED IT!!!

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My Father was the President of Egypt

Caricature drawn by Sara Abd El Azim during the revolution, Photo: Sara Abd El Azim (Twitter @lujee), http://lewjee.blogspot.com

Caricature drawn by Sara Abd El Azim during the revolution, Photo: Sara Abd El Azim (Twitter @lujee), http://lewjee.blogspot.com

In the run up to the toppling of the then president Mohamed Hosny Mubarak, his parasitic group in power did their utmost to keep him in place. Government-controlled media took up mass propaganda by fabricating stories and advocating the ex-president’s merits.

The loyalists were using a message they thought would make most people quiet down, a message that had proven effective in the past – the president is your father.

It was a clever card to play, addressing the strong emotional bond between Egyptians and their families. A family in Egypt is widely seen as the building block of society, and its well-being is the number one priority to all its members.

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