Tag Archives: Living in Germany

Christmas Markets in Erlangen

by Alie of The Erlangen Expat and Starting Over in Stuttgart

Photo: public domain, photographer martin spiske

Photo: public domain, photographer martin spiske

One thing Germany does well is Christmas.

– It’s not so much about the presents but the presence of family and friends

– It’s not so much shop ’til you drop but maintaining an appropriately warming level of Glühwein in your system

– Its not so much rain and more snow (hopefully)

The magic that you felt as a child can definitely be rekindled into a grown up wonder as the Christmas Markets start springing up, practically overnight. However many “German Christmas Markets” you have been to in your home country, all I can say is “you aint seen nothing yet!”

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Studying in Germany 101

by Sebastian Cuevas

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s been almost six years since I moved to Germany from Portland, Oregon, for a semester abroad. Little did I know back then that I would end up getting both my Bachelor’s and my Master’s at the University of Heidelberg, Germany’s oldest. I mean, I did want to try and stay, but I didn’t know how to go about the whole thing. There were problems from day one, mostly caused by negative attitudes.

It was all a matter of being determined. Nevertheless, determination can dwindle when faced with people’s unwillingness to help you, especially if you’re abroad and don’t speak the language all that well. That’s when stubbornness comes in. I was first told I couldn’t transfer, but I didn’t believe them.

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The Role of German Art

Today Guarav Kedia will be taking over the Young Germany blog to tell you a little bit about his experiences here. He initially came to Germany to do a short intership–or so he thought.  But after working at the University of Stuttgart, he decided to stay and began a MSc degree program. Read more about him here.

Photo: Death to Stock Photos

Photo: Death to Stock Photos

Aristotle once said that the aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. Indeed this is what I found in Germany. German art played a major role for me to understand the depth of their shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices.

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Expat Life: Things I Miss Now that I’ve Moved to Germany

by California Globetrotter

Photo: Public domain. Photographer: Matt Hobbs

Photo: Public domain. Photographer: Matt Hobbs

While it is an amazing, once in a lifetime experience to get the chance to live abroad in a country other than America, there are aspects from home I will always miss. At the time, living in the States, you take it for granted and don’t appreciate it quite as much at 2am as you should. Now that I have lived in Germany for almost 3 years, I realize now, just how much I miss many things in the States.

1. No-Smoking Sections

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Why You Will Never Be the Same After Living in Germany

by California Globetrotter

Copyright dpa

Copyright dpa

1. No Beer Festival Will Ever Compare

Admit it, Germans know how to do Beer festivals better than anyone else in the world! After going to Oktoberfest or any other beer festival in Germany, all others will seem boring compared to that time you went to Dult!

2. Schloss Neuschwanstein will make you feel like a Disney Princess

There aren’t many castles that compare to the magnitude of beauty that inspired Walt Disney to add the image of the castle before every Disney movie. All your dreams will come true here!

3. Once you go German beer, there is no going back to American beer

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Expat Life: How Germany Has Changed Me

by Alie of The Erlangen Expat and Starting Over in Stuttgart

Photo (cc) flickr user Shelley and Dave

Photo (cc) flickr user Shelley and Dave

Living for the holidays is something common to I and most of my friends back in the UK. Working very hard is commonplace, and after family, taking care of yourself, renovating your home, seeing your friends you don’t end up with a whole heap of free time to ‘be’.

When we arrived in Germany (and lived in hotels for three months) quiet time (1pm-3pm), shops closing at 8pm and very little being open on Sundays wasn’t a big deal, in fact it was refreshing and really relaxing, which was great considering the stress of the moves so far. However when we moved into our apartment (which came with its very own set of rules) I began to understand other expats hostile reactions to what they saw as the restrictive elements of German life.

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Expat Life: Dealing With Homesickness

by Alie of The Erlangen Expat and Starting Over in Stuttgart

Plany wing black and white http://www.gratisography.com/

Photo http://www.gratisography.com/

I don’t like to use the word homesick when I miss my family and friends, home homesick is more like it.

Home is here, where I live, love, eat and sleep, my husband, my friends and potentially my future. I’m not sick for home as I’m already there, I have more than enough to be happy here but sometimes there is a nagging ache that I can’t quite put my finger on. A physical pain in my heart and a heaviness that I carry through my day, until I can either shake it off, or wallow in its glorious miserableness. I’m sick for home home.

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