Tag Archives: life in germany

Biking in Germany versus Biking in the UK

by Alie of The Erlangen Expat and Starting Over in Stuttgart

Photo copyright dpa / picture alliance

Photo copyright dpa / picture alliance

I’m very lucky that Erlangen and the surrounding areas are so utterly bike friendly that even a beginner (Anfänger) can get around safely. Now I am indeed no expert when it comes to biking BUT a bike is my main form of transport here in Germany and may be yours too, it’s worth doing some research, particularly if like me you hadn’t ridden a bike since childhood (and weren’t much good then either).

Comparisons

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The Expat Adjustment Cycle

by Alie of The Erlangen Expat and Starting Over in Stuttgart

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

An explanation of why you feel fantastic at times, and downright crap at others!

Now I’m no psychologist but the cycle of highs and lows you experience as an expat is common to expats the world over. I’ve have done quite a bit of research in this because I did feel like I was going slightly crazy at times, I thankfully wasn’t and was grateful that I was not the only one going through great and hard times.

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A New Science Blog on deutschland.de

Cintia Nunes in Hamburg

Cintia Nunes in Hamburg

Our sister site deutschland.de has started a new blog series, in English and German, about the lives and work of researches in (or closely connected to) Germany.

Check out the first two posts right here.

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The Week in Germany: Bilingual Families, Homesickness, and Kita

Photo: Gratisography

Photo: Gratisography

Bilingualism does not have to be a sacrifice

“While I don’t disagree with the fact that raising multilingual children CAN BE time consuming or expensive or even that it may mean a few sacrifices along the way, I think articles like these just approach the topic from the wrong end of the stick. Would you write/read an article about how much money you need to spend to raise your monolingual child (in terms of language costs I mean): buying him/her books , DVDs, finding a nanny or a playgroup to go to? Probably not.” Read more here.

Coping with homesickness

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One Year in Berlin: Guerilla Knitting

by Patrick Molligo

Photo courtesy Patrick Molligo

Photo courtesy Patrick Molligo

Things seem to be simmering down now, but lately relations between Germany and the U.S. have been less than perfect. I’m not sure about the media coverage back home, but here every newspaper is filled with headlines about the NSA affair that’s taken the world by storm.

Luckily tensions aren’t running too high in my apartment. In fact, last week my landlady, Renate seemed much more concerned with a local project that she’s been working on for the last fews years. Allow me to explain.

Photo courtesy Patrick Molligo

Photo courtesy Patrick Molligo

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The Week in Germany: The Berlin Wall Is Back, Neukölln Guide, Halloween, and Some Other Stuff

Kloster Eberbach. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

Kloster Eberbach. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

The Berlin Wall is going back up.

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of its fall, the Berlin Wall is going back up…in the form of glowing, balloon-like orbs.  It is going to be a gorgeous memorial, a visual haunting by the wall’s ghost.  Read more about it on Fotostrasse.

A haunted house to complete your Halloween.

Over at Abandoned Berlin you can creep yourself out with photos of a building where Nazi uniforms were made.  I hear there is exciting news brewing over at Abandoned Berlin as well…but more on that later.  Go look at this spooky place right here.

Is Neukölln the coolest neighborhood in Berlin?

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Living in Germany: On German Directness

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

Liv Hambrett is an Australian expat living in Germany.  Visit her blog, follow her on twitter, or buy a copy of Sincere Forms of Flattery, an anthology that includes her work.

Often here, misunderstandings occur not so much as a result of linguistic fumbling, but because of a certain scale of directness, at the opposing ends of which sit my own heritage and my adopted home. How I react, disagree, say yes, make conversation, how I oil the cogs of social interaction, how I try to translate little phrases from English to German, the ones that mark certain points in a conversation … it all comes from my own socio-cultural norms, ones that tend to sit if not in direct opposition to the German ones, then at least somewhere on the other side of the fence.

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