Tag Archives: learning German

The Week in Germany: Berlin, Berlin, Dogs, Visas, Etc

Berlin's East Side Gallery.  Photo copyright dpa

Berlin’s East Side Gallery. Photo copyright dpa

In case you need some fodder for your street art festish.

Leather and Abel went on a Berlin graffiti tour and took pictures and will tell you all about it right here.

Or for your abandoned buildings fetish.

An abandoned bowling alley!?  How weird and creepy and cool.  Check out stories and photos here.

Germany loves dogs.

And so does Berlin.  But everything that Fotostrasse say about dogs in Berlin applies to most of the rest of the country as well.  (The generals, obviously, not the specifics.)

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Learning German: Finding Freedom in a Foreign Language

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

Sometimes I’m more at ease speaking German than English, as if you can hide behind it or something. It not being my first language allows for misunderstandings, and not necessarily just linguistic ones. Furthermore, I’ve learnt to be assertive, in German. I said that was one of the typical German characteristics I’d love to pick up on during my year abroad but I really didn’t think it could happen. Somehow though, it has.

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Learning German: Bavarian Dialects

Key in door

Photo copyright dpa

Liv Hambrett is an Australian expat living in Germany.  Visit her blog, follow her on twitter, or buy a copy of Sincere Forms of Flattery, an anthology that includes her work.

And I am back to not understanding a single word of what is going on around me. I feel like I have rewound back to 2010, when I landed in Münster with three words of German – danke, bitte and polizei – and existed in perpetual terror the bus driver was going to want to say something to me over the speaker and I wouldn’t understand it (which happened, often. I still have the irrational feeling bus drivers will call me out in front of the whole bus based on a few consecutive Münster experiences.)

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Living in Germany: The Language Battle

Photo copyright dpa / picture alliance

Photo copyright dpa / picture alliance

Liv Hambrett is an Australian expat living in Germany.  Visit her blog, follow her on twitter, or buy a copy of Sincere Forms of Flattery, an anthology that includes her work.

Most of the time here, I can crack out my German in shops and cafes and restaurants with aplomb, or in social settings, engage in a monolingual conversation that makes me feel both smug (look at me go) and embarrassed (did I just murder a case?) at the same time, a sensation peculiar to learning and speaking a foreign language … or is that just me? But there are other occasions were something else happens and it’s usually in a bar and usually with bright young things who grew up with American pop culture squawking loudly in one ear and an English teacher in the other, from around the age of six. On these occasions, the conversation becomes bilingual, but in reverse. Allow me to elaborate.

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Fernweh und Heimweh

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

Fernweh is another one of those German words that just doesn’t exist in English. It’s pretty much the same as Wanderlust, a yearning to be away, to travel, see different places, et cetera.
Heimweh on the other hand is the yearning to be at home, or simply put, homesickness.

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Learning German: Sprechen Sie Deutsch?

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

Today, I passed a second-hand children’s clothing shop on the way to one of my lectures, and the name above the door–written in English–read “Two Hands for Kids.”  Ja really. I had to giggle just a little bit.

English words, phrases, slogans, in fact, the English language in general is very popular here, much to my disappointment.

The biggest difficulty I’ve had here so far is speaking German. It’s not that I can’t, it’s just that I can’t seem to find anyone to talk to. With the native English speakers it’s a bit unnatural not to speak English, and the other Erasmus students are generally more comfortable speaking English than German. The Germans themselves seem to see me as a means to practice their English.

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The German Language: My Top Ten Words

Photo copyright dpa/photo alliance

Photo copyright dpa/photo alliance

German is such a brilliantly mis-represented language. How a language with words like Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän could be considered long-winded or aggressive is just beyond me.. sie ist doch so ‘ne schöne Sprache.

Here are my top ten favorites:

1. Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft

Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services. (79 characters.. woah!)

2. Kummerspeck

Noun for weight gained from emotional over-eating. Literally: grief bacon. (Awesome)

3. Mauerbauertraurigkeit

The inexplicable urge to push people away.  Literally; wall-builder-sadness.

4. Kühlschrank

Fridge. Literally: cold wardrbobe. (Makes sense.)

5. Weltschmerz

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