The Dirndl, Or: Clothes Make the Woman

by Alie of The Erlangen Expat and Starting Over in Stuttgart

Photo courtesy Rare Dirndl

Photo courtesy Rare Dirndl

Now I’m not talking about just any kind of clothes here, I’m talking about German traditional clothes or Trachten. Men wear lederhosen (real men anyway) and women get the opportunity to wear a supremely flattering and beautiful outfit which they call a dirndl (pronounced Deer-n-dil).

The dirndl I refer to is not the very traditional dress that some Germans wear for celebrations but the more modern form of dress that is easy to wear and comes in may different styles, colours and price ranges. You can see the more traditionally dressed women at local events, they will often have matching outfits since they are part of the same group. Their outfits are beautiful down to the wicker bag and fresh flowers they tote.

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madrid

Madrid in 180 seconds

Three by four metres. Four by seven? Five by eight? At all events, the sought-for object is definitely huge. The film-maker María Rogel and her team are on the trail of the riddle – in Madrid’s streets, in its cafés and finally in the Reina Sofía Museum, where restorer Jorge García Gómez-Tejedor gives the riddle-solvers help.

Click in the image to start the video!

Click in the image to start the video!

Learn more about the #180sec project on goethe.de/180sec

MADRID
www.goethe.de/spanien/magazin

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The Week in Germany: Bilinguals, Supstition, and Asparagus

Photo Public Domain: http://publicdomainarchive.com

Photo Public Domain: http://publicdomainarchive.com

Talking about The Germans as an expat

“Despite being a fairly homogeneous country Germany is still very regional when it comes to much of it’s culture, language (darn you regional dialects!), attitudes and general friendliness.  Even within regions there is a high level of diversity.  When we lived in Malente I had some of my positive experiences with strangers going out of their way to offer help.  Still we also had to deal with neighbors who made it clear they weren’t happy to be sharing an building with an American.  And herein lies the problem with stereotypes, they are too narrow to accurately define the parameters of reality.” Read more on Nine and ninety nine.

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leipzig

Leipzig in 180 Seconds

Matthias Müller, the sexton of Leipzig’s Nikolai Church, tells how the Peaceful Revolution in autumn 1989 began at the Monday Prayers in the building – how thousands of people walked through the Leipzig city centre chanting “We are the people” and finally changed a system.

Today too the sexton invites the public on Mondays to prayers for peace, because it is still important, he says, that we set an example for democracy.

Click on the image to start the video

Click on the image to start the video

Learn more about the #180sec project on goethe.de/180sec

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Reading in German: Some Recommendations

Cover of Der Seiten der Welt by Kai Meyers

Cover of Der Seiten der Welt by Kai Meyers

Looking for something to read…auf Deutsch?  Here are a few suggestions from our resident obsessive reader.  If you don’t see anything that catches your eye, you can find more recommendations here and here.

Die Seiten der Welt by Kai Meyers

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