Category Archives: The German Language

Deutsch@YG and first-hand accounts from the desks of German language classes.

11 Blogs that Will Help You Learn German

by Sadie Douse

Photo Gratisography

Photo Gratisography

Have you ever thought about learning a new language but dropped the idea as soon as you thought about the resources? German is one of those languages that people love to learn, but many beginners have no clue as to where and how to start.

Learning German can be a daunting task, especially if you want to learn it online without any professional guidance. There are a myriad of websites. Which should you rely on? However, there are a lot of blogs who are making the job easier for German enthusiasts. If you want to learn German online for free, you should check out the following blogs.

  1. Fluent In Three Months
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Seven Reasons to Learn a Foreign Language

by California Globetrotter

Photo: Gratisography

Photo: Gratisography

My first encounter with learning a foreign language started at the young age of 8 or 9 when I temporarily had to go to a predominately Mexican school. I remember struggling to learn math because my teachers would often speak in Spanish. This was no easy task for a native English speaker. Needless to say, my math is terrible. But I remember the joy of standing in our school auditorium, wearing my best dress and singing Feliz Navidad fluently with the rest of my class at Christmas. Ever since, I have had a love affair with this song and languages.

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Nine Awesome German Idioms

by California Globetrotter

Photo copyright Wolfram Steinberg, dpa

Photo copyright Wolfram Steinberg, dpa

1. Luck in Love

For those of you who are hard-core board/card gamers, maybe it’s best if you lose every now and then. As the Germans say, “Glück im Spiel, pech in der Liebe” which translates to “Luck in the game, unlucky in love.” I’d rather get lucky oh sorry, I meant be lucky in love any day!

2. Cups in the Cupboard

For your friends who eventually all go a bit crazy every now and then, say as the Germans would say, “Alle Tasse im Schrank” which means that someone has “lost their marbles”.

3. Hot Love

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Strange German Phrases, Explained

by Reema Singhal

Photo: Gratisography

Photo: Gratisography

Imagine you’re born in Europe, some place like Germany let’s say, and you’re now all grown up and you catch the disease of wanting to travel somewhere. To some obscure little country tucked away somewhere far in the world that you saw a documentary about ages ago. Let’s say Bhutan (I dare you to tell me where it is—without checking Google).

So you get a map, assemble your back-breaking backpack, and fly down to that lovely little Himalayan country, Bhutan. You’re all hubbly and bubbly and shaky with excited butterflies dancing all over your insides.

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The Awful German Language: An Expat Bloggers Blog Hop

Gutaussehender Geschäftsmann drückt die JA Taste auf einen virtuellen Schirm

If there were an award for “person who hates the German language the loudest,” Mark Twain would have won it.  No one has satirized the German language quite as hilariously before or since.  As he says:

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Learning German: Finding Freedom in a Foreign Language

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

Sometimes I’m more at ease speaking German than English, as if you can hide behind it or something. It not being my first language allows for misunderstandings, and not necessarily just linguistic ones. Furthermore, I’ve learnt to be assertive, in German. I said that was one of the typical German characteristics I’d love to pick up on during my year abroad but I really didn’t think it could happen. Somehow though, it has.

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Learning German: Bavarian Dialects

Key in door

Photo copyright dpa

Liv Hambrett is an Australian expat living in Germany.  Visit her blog, follow her on twitter, or buy a copy of Sincere Forms of Flattery, an anthology that includes her work.

And I am back to not understanding a single word of what is going on around me. I feel like I have rewound back to 2010, when I landed in Münster with three words of German – danke, bitte and polizei – and existed in perpetual terror the bus driver was going to want to say something to me over the speaker and I wouldn’t understand it (which happened, often. I still have the irrational feeling bus drivers will call me out in front of the whole bus based on a few consecutive Münster experiences.)

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