Category Archives: Food

Traditional Bavarian Weißwurst

by California Globetrotter

Weißwurst. Photo copyright dpa

Weißwurst. Photo copyright dpa

Bavarians are proud to eat their Weißwurst – a soft white sausage usually eaten for breakfast with a salted pretzel and a glass of beer. There is a saying that the sausages should never hear the chime of the 12 o’clock bells, therefore, they are to be eaten only in the mornings.

If one is to learn to become a true Bavarian, then one needs to learn to cook, peel and eat a Weißwurst like real Bavarian. Although, when I say eat, I really mean the traditional way. The traditional way, called “zuzeln” is by sucking the wurst out of the skin. But, I will save that for only diehards looking to do things the traditional way. I know my Bavarian family would be ashamed of me for saying this, but I will stick with slicing, peeling and then cutting my Weißwurst into pieces like a normal person. :)

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German Comfort Food

by Nadia Hassani

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

“Do you want to come over for plum dumplings?”, I asked my friend Gabriele last week after I found a bag of Italian plums in the freezer that I had bought at a farm stand in late summer specifically to make those dumplings. Of course she said yes. Although she has lived in the United States twice as long as I have, she craves that stuff just as much as I do.

So here we were sitting in the kitchen, blissfully digging in. With this type of food, every forkful brings up memories of mothers and grandmothers in their kitchens who made it for us many miles and many years away. Nostalgia lingers in the air, leaving behind a few sprinkles of homesickness like the cinnamon sugar on our plates.

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German Cuisine: Carnival Delights

by Nadia Hassani

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

With carnival last week in Germany, and the cold weather, I felt like indulging in some deep-fried treats. These pastries from southern Germany are called Nonnenfürzchen or Nonnenfürzle. If you understand German, never mind the name, it does not mean what you think. It is based on middle low German and means “what nuns do best”.

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The German Supermarket Experience…When You’ve Just Arrived in Germany

by Melissa Alvarado

veggies raumrot

Photo via Raumrot

A week had passed since I arrived in Germany, back in June. I was pretty tired of eating out, and I wanted to cook something at home or at least have food in my fridge. So, as anybody would do, I went to the supermarket.

I know! There’s nothing fantastic or worth writing about going to the supermarket… Except when you have absolutely no idea how things are called in German and you end up spending two hours wandering around the halls and starving.

That’s exactly how my first experience in a German supermarket was: Not normal. At all.

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German Cuisine: Making Eierlikör

by Nadia Hassani

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

On my yearly visits to Germany I realize how the once familiar becomes unfamiliar, which often leads to funny situations. A few years ago I wanted to bake an American cheesecake. At the grocery store I paced up and down the cooler section several times looking for eggs and eventually asked a sales clerk. He stared at me, then walked me to a different part of the store with a shelf fully stocked with eggs. I stood there perplexed and it dawned on me that in Germany, unlike in the United States, eggs are often not refrigerated.

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Spoonfuls of Germany: The Truth About Hänsel and Gretel

by Nadia Hassani

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

We had several inches of snow at Thanksgiving. Our house with its lit windows created a winter wonderland look – like the gingerbread house in Hänsel and Gretel. It put me in the mood to make a gingerbread house.

As I looked through recipes and assembled ingredients and patterns, it hit me that I do not know much about the origin of the gingerbread house tradition. I vaguely recalled a witch’s gingerbread house as the crime scene in Hänsel and Gretel, a fairytale by the Grimm Brothers.

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German Cuisine: Holiday Bread

by Nadia Hassani

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo courtesy Spoonfuls of Germany

Sweet German Christmas specialties are the only area that seems to be untouched and untainted by the stereotype surrounding German cuisine.

Every Christmas season, German producers ship their goods all over the world, in wooden boxes and colorful metal tins embossed with winter village scenes. During GDR times, Salzwedeler Baumkuchen, the famous tree cake consisting of a mass of layers, was nationalized and the cake was produced solely for export. This not only brought in Western currency but it eventually ensured the survival of that unique tradition.

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