Category Archives: Food

German Cuisine: Why Marlene Dietrich Disliked Rutabagas

by Nadia Hassani

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

The third winter of World War I, whose beginning a century ago is commemorated this year, is also referred to in German as the Hungerwinter or Steckrübenwinter (Rutabaga winter). The blockade of Germany through the North Sea cut the country off from overseas trade and supplies, and the potato crop in 1916 had failed. As a result rutabagas, until that time mainly grown as animal fodder, became a staple of the 1,000-calorie ration-card diet for civilians.

Marlene Dietrich was then a teenager in Berlin. She would recall with a shudder how her family ate rutabagas for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and in every possible form. Most people’s faces turned yellow from all the rutabagas, hers didn’t. Her perfect, porcelain-like complexion stood out already then.

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German Cuisine: Looking East

By Nadia Hassani

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

Today we are happy to welcome Nadia Hassani to Young Germany.  Nadia loves German cuisine and is the author of the book Spoonfuls of Germany.  You can find out more about her here.  You can find her blogging about German food (with gorgeous photos) on Spoonfuls of Germany.

If there is one thing I regret I did not do while I was still living in Germany, it is that I did not see more of the world behind the Iron Curtain that opened up after the Berlin Wall came down in 1989. I spent a good amount of time in Berlin in 1991, and I am glad I did because at least I got a glimpse how East Berlin had looked under communist rule.

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German Food: Hearty Cravings

by Alexandra Ioakim of Flythesevenseas

Photo courtesy Sail the Seven Seas

Photo courtesy Fly the Seven Seas

Before moving to Germany, my knowledge of German food consisted of popular items found on the menu of Sydney’s Löwenbräukeller (pronounced Low-en-brow in Australia, and Looe-ven-broi in German) – schnitzel, sausages, pork knuckle and sauerkraut. As a self-professed ‘foodie’ (as they say) I would often watch Maeve O’Mara’s Food Safari and Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations and was interested enough to listen to my mum’s tips to know that in general Germans love a good apple cake, a potato could accompany most meals and German bread was an art form.

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The Coffee Connection

by Nadia Hassani

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

Today we are happy to welcome Nadia Hassani to Young Germany.  Nadia loves German cuisine and is the author of the book Spoonfuls of Germany.  You can find out more about her here.  You can find her blogging about German food (with gorgeous photos) on Spoonfuls of Germany.

During spring cleaning this week, I considered throwing out a pair of dark brown suede gloves, my longtime favorites. I’ve had them for more than a decade and they are worn but the thought of tossing them passed and I decided to keep them after all.

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Expat Life: Five Things I Never Would Have Eaten If I Hadn’t Moved to Germany

by Deanna H

So many times I think to myself, “Wow, I would’ve never done that, tried that, seen that, had I not moved to Germany”. I’m quite sure if you are a fellow expat, you’ve also had these thoughts.

Food can be a big cultural difference and only further exacerbating that culture shock you feel when you move to a new country. While other countries may have similar things, they are typically different in their own way. Think, pizza. How many different styles of pizza can you think of? Exactly.

Aside from beer and bratwurst, Germany has so many other delicacies to offer. Here are five that were new for me:

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German Cuisine: Summer Drinks

Photo copyright Liv Hambrett

Photo copyright Liv Hambrett

Too cold to remember summer?  Try one of Liv Hambrett’s favorite summer drinks to remind yourself.  Only four, five, six more months to go…

Perhaps because Summer is such a short-lived, hard-earned novelty over here, the Germans go bananas when it comes and celebrate it in all manner of ways. They crack out their sandals, dust off their mini-portable grills and grill turkey breast and pork steaks like maniacs. They flock to parks and cafes with outdoor seating – indeed cafes you hitherto had no idea could actually have outdoor seating, manage to cram their portion of the pathway full of chairs (topped with the obligatory blanket in case the weather turns) and stay there until the sun starts to dip. Spring-time Spargel madness gives way to summer-time strawberry madness. People eat ice cream all the time.

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