Category Archives: Frankfurt am Main

The 2015 Frankfurt Book Fair: Costumes on Sunday

IMG_0351

The final day of the Frankfurt Book Fair is also the most colorful. With a cosplay competition on Sunday afternoon, the Fair fills with people in incredible costumes, giving the scene a comic-con vibe. From the princesses of Frozen to Pokemon to comic book heroes to evening wear made from the pages of books, it is a visual feast, and a great day to bring kids along.

IMG_0356Sadly, bringing kids along also makes it hard to take photographs (at least when they’re small), but so it goes. With my daughter in tow, we strolled and gaped at the hundreds of brightly colored creations, all busy taking photos, making videos, and admiring each other’s wardrobes. My daughter was delighted. And so was I. Especially when I saw the book-page evening wear pictured above.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

The 2015 Frankfurt Book Fair: Day Three

The Gourmet Gallery at the 2015 Frankfurt Book Fair. Photo c Nicolette Stewart

The Gourmet Gallery at the 2015 Frankfurt Book Fair. Photo c Nicolette Stewart

The Gourmet Gallery at the Frankfurt Book Fair is home to cookbook exhibits, cooking demonstrations, and–most fun of all–samples and taste tests. Though when left to my own devices I focus on novels while I am at the fair, on Friday I met up with Christie, the food blogger behind A Sausage Has Two, who convinced me to check out more of the Fair’s food events.

The Gourmet Gallery isn’t the only area where cookbooks, food, and chefs are displaying their many talents–many of the country-hosted stands feature edible demonstrations as well. The first event we attended was a demonstration by Dato’ Chef Ismail Ahmad, who showed us how to make a spicy Malaysian salad with shrimp and bean sprouts.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

At the 2015 Frankfurt Book Fair: Day Two

Frankfurt Book Fair 2015. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

Frankfurt Book Fair 2015. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

How many kilometers have I walked in the past two days? More than I would probably believe. Just exploring one hall at the Frankfurt Book Fair would fill a day’s Fitbit, I’m sure of it. And I walked three. Excuse me while I go take a nap before gearing up for the evening’s events… Zzzzzzzz.

The funny thing about the Frankfurt Book Fair? You can’t actually buy any books. Ba-da-bing! Come to the book fair and don’t buy books! It isn’t what most people expect from an enormous event with the word “book” in the title. But it shifts the focus from consumption to admiration, and at the end of the day, it is probably a very good thing for my wallet. Only on Sunday are exhibitors allowed to sell their wares (though of course here and there things are being bought and sold), so if you want to buy something, Sunday is the day to do it.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

At the 2015 Frankfurt Book Fair: Day One

Today we have quite a few photos to share, but they won’t be wordless (tune in again next Wednesday for your usual Wordless Wednesday post). In fact, every single one of the pictures we want to show you today is all about words. Words, printed on paper, and on display at the Frankfurt Book Fair this week.

Frankfurt Book Fair 2015. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

Frankfurt Book Fair 2015. This year Indonesia is the host country. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

As the Frankfurt Book Fair host country this year, Indonesia has set up a large exhibit in the Fair Hall Forum. It is a cool, dark, otherworldly place that makes you feel like you’re underwater, surrounded by strange, glowing creatures.  It is one of the most chill areas to hang out at the fair, so if you’re attending, don’t forget to stop by.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

Here Comes the Frankfurt Book Fair!

The Frankfurt Book Fair 2014. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

The Frankfurt Book Fair 2014. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

The Frankfurt Book Fair is all about presentation, spectacle, promotion, and celebration. On Sunday you won’t want to miss the cosplay competition that fills the halls with colorful, eye-catching costumes (this is the best day to come with kids as Saturday can be prohibitively full). A day ticket for a private visitor costs 18 euros. (See further private ticket options here.) But my personal recommendation? Grab your camera and wander. Let your mouth hang open in wonder as you gape at shiny new covers, at strange visual promotions, and at famous authors you didn’t know were coming because the calendar of events is an enormous pain in the ass (more on that in a second).

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

Frankfurt’s Steamy Side

The Rhein-Main Therme had two delightful log-cabin-style outdoor saunas. Photo (cc) flickr user Romain Cloff

I’ve written about it before, and I’ll write about it again.  I can’t get enough.  I’d do it every single week if I could.  Every day even.  I’m talking about visiting the sauna.  And for anyone who loves the steamy tradition, Germany is a great place to be.

Resident on Earth has explained sauna etiquette, and I have raved about my favorite sauna in Mainz before.  But having recently moved to Frankfurt am Main, I now have a whole new set of what are called Sauna Landschaften to explore.  I couldn’t be happier.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...

Celebrate 25 Years of German Unity With Ottmar Hörl’s Unity Man

Ampelmännchen displayed at the Frankfurt Römer in Ottmar Hörl's installation Overcoming Boundaries. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

Ampelmännchen displayed at the Frankfurt Römer in Ottmar Hörl’s installation Overcoming Boundaries. Photo copyright Nicolette Stewart

Ottmar Hörl’s installation Overcoming Boundaries was commissioned as part of the celebration of the 25-year anniversary of German Reunification.  The statues, which are 38-centimeters tall and made of light, weather-resistant plastic, are intended as symbols for Germany’s future and an invitation for viewers to spend a few minutes thinking about the issues or joining in the conversation surrounding the anniversay.

“Everyone is intended to get involved, to contemplate these issues, find new ways to improve our social and political systems, contribute to the debate, to intervene—and everyone should do it their way. Ideally, this may result in new ways of looking at things, new ways of doing things, so that ‘borders can be overcome,’” explains Hörl in a pamphlet available at the exhibition.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...