Author Archives: David Herbling

The World Cup legacy

As seen at the MTN Fan Zone in Montecasino, Johannesburg. Photo (cc) flickr user Axel Bührmann

As seen at the MTN Fan Zone in Montecasino, Johannesburg. Photo (cc) flickr user Axel Bührmann

The world’s most spectacular football bonanza; the World Cup, has finally come to an end. Looking back at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, it will be remembered by many with nostalgia.

Both on and off the pitch, the tournament was never short of drama.  There were lots of surprises on the pitch. Spain, the reigning champions, lost their first match to Suisse. England and Argentina were crashed out by Germany in convincing victories as Holland cut Brazil`s dream for their sixth win of the coveted trophy. The Black Stars of Ghana wrote their own history by reaching the quarter finals. All the other African teams crashed out in the first round.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Germany, spain, and the octopus

Fans watched tensely as Germany faced Spain this week.  Photo (cc) flickr user monicamüller

Fans watched tensely as Germany faced Spain this week. Photo (cc) flickr user monicamüller

It was painful and sad for me to see Germany knocked out of the 2010 World Cup finals in South Africa. I had predicted that Germany would lift the coveted trophy this year.

I watched the game with some sense of confidence. But with a cagey first half, the game became lively in the second half as both teams sought to edge out the opponent.

Puyol’s header gave the Spaniards a World Cup final ticket and robbed me of my spirits. After 90 minutes of play, I knew I had been wrong.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

The End of the World Cup for Africa

Ghana’s Isaac Vorsah (l) consoles his teammate Kwadwo Asamoah after their defeat in penalties at the World Cup Quarter Finals against Uruguay July 2. Photo: picture alliance / dpa

Ghana’s Isaac Vorsah (l) consoles his teammate Kwadwo Asamoah after their defeat in penalties at the World Cup Quarter Finals against Uruguay July 2. Photo: picture alliance / dpa

Friday, July 2 is a day many African football fans would love to forget. Holding onto hope for 90 minutes and then for another 30 minutes, everything faded into a sense of hopelessness.

After Asamoah Gyan squandered a last-minute penalty kick by hitting it wide to the crossbar, and a further sheepish kick by Captain John Mensah, everything went silent here in Mombasa City.

The Black Stars have none but themselves to blame for their exit. They painted the entire African sky black with darkness.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Twinkle Twinkle Black Stars

John Pantsil of Ghana celebrates the team’s victory with a national flag after the 2010 World Cup round of 16 match against the United States June 26, 2010. Ghana won 2-1 and qualified for the round of 8. Photo: picture alliance / Photoshot

John Pantsil of Ghana celebrates the team’s victory with a national flag after the 2010 World Cup round of 16 match against the United States June 26, 2010. Ghana won 2-1 and qualified for the round of 8. Photo: picture alliance / Photoshot

It was a weekend like no other in Nairobi. With only one African team left in the round of 16, the match between Ghana and the United States was a must see. Everyone in town was talking about the clash. After the final whistle, the US saw stars, black in colour I guess. Truly, the superpower had been outdone.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

An African World Cup?

Fans in the stands at the FIFA World Cup 2010 group E match between Cameroon and Denmark June 19, 2010. Photo: Ronald Wittek, (c) dpa

Fans in the stands at the FIFA World Cup 2010 group E match between Cameroon and Denmark June 19, 2010. Photo: Ronald Wittek, (c) dpa

I am writing this exactly ten days after the World Cup kicked off in South Africa; historically being held in Africa for the very first time. It has been dubbed a Once In a Lifetime tourney; others have billed it as This Time For Africa.

Many have been looking forward to an African World Cup. And it has truly lived up to expectations. Yes, because in Africa strange things happen, you know, something out of the ordinary.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Meet the World Cup bloggers: David Herbling

David Herbling

David Herbling

David Herbling (26) comes from Kenya, where he’s currently a student at Kenyatta University pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree in Education. Herbling studied for a year in Japan as part of a research program and loves Germany.

As a Kenyan, Herbling is especially excited that this year’s World Cup has come to African soil. He, like nearly every Kenyan, has loved football since as long as he can remember. He’s an avid follower of the European football leagues, the UEFA European Football Championship and of course, the biggest football event of all, the World Cup.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...