The Week in Germany: Jobs, July Eats, Soccer, and Aldi

Gutaussehender Geschäftsmann drückt die JA Taste auf einen virtuellen Schirm

Getting a Job in Germany

A lot of people write to us asking about how to find a job in Germany.  In this blog post, Australian expat Geek Mädel weighs in on the question.  Read the post here.

July Eats in Germany

“July in south-central Germany: the sun is hot and high in the sky and seasonal eating is all about fruit.  In the orchards, plump stone fruits hang heavily from the trees; at the farmers’ markets, stands are laden with fat, oozing plums and apricots and the berries are so ripe and plentiful that you can buy them on the cheap for making jam.  Twice a week in July I return home from the marketplace weighed down by bags of sweet, juicy locally-grown fruit: if you’re enjoying the summer crops of berries and stone fruits as much as I am, then here are a few ideas with what to do with them all…”  Read more about what to eat in Germany on Eating Wiesbaden.

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What’s Underneath a Lid

by Nadia Hassani

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

Photo copyright Spoonfuls of Germany

At breakfast with a friend and her daughter in Germany a few years ago, I quietly held my breath wondering how the little girl would eat her yogurt. And she did it! Without interrupting her happy chatter, she peeled back the foil, then scraped off the tiny bit of yogurt before eating the whole thing.

I leaned back, relieved and touched. My friend had passed on to her daughter what we were taught as kids.

Although I was born 20 years after the end of World War II and never suffered shortages of any kind, the commandment, “Do not waste food” of my grandmother’s generation was instilled in me. That mentality is, of course, not a peculiar German one. Americans who lived through the Great Depression were equally mindful of food waste.

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Living in Germany: Dressing Up

by Alexandra Ioakim of Flythesevenseas

Photo courtesy Sailthesevenseas

Photo courtesy Flythesevenseas

Our firm hosted a ‘sales and marketing day’ last week for the all employees in the Munich office to ‘promote talent and opportunities across service lines’ – i.e. a means to justify a large celebration.
Lured by a night out for a pre-Oktoberfest party (and informative workshops of course)  I accepted the invitation. In preparation for the event, the invitation described:

Dresscode           
Dre Dresscode sowohl für die Tages – als auch die Abendveranstaltung ist Tracht, bayerischer Landhausstil oder Casual.
(The dresscode for both the day-time and evening event is Tracht (Dirndl / Lederhosen), Bavarian country estate style or casual).
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So Long, World Cup

It’s hard to believe that the World Cup is already over.  And with Germany coming out on top, what a lot of fun it has been.  We’ve had thirteen bloggers covering the ups and downs of the event since the beginning, and we wanted to take a moment to thank all of them for writing and all of you for reading and commenting.

We ended up with a total of 60 World Cup posts (which you can still find here if you just want to keep reliving the event) with Joshua Burns as our blogging superstar with over 18 percent of the posts.  Here here.  Thank you so much guys!

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The Everyday Expat: Understanding Cultural Awareness

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

Culture shock is often discussed when people consider moving abroad. Differences between home and destination country cultures can be confusing and difficult to navigate and the radical change in lifestyle can be harder than you might have imagined. Yet one of the best ways of preparing for ‘culture shock’ is by working on your cultural awareness – something which is less debated but in reality much more important for the success of your expat life long term.

Cultural awareness can be prepared for in advance but it is, above all else, something which is actively practised. Reading about your destination country before you go, especially advice from other expats, can give you a really good understanding of where you’re moving to, but once you’re there, remember to observe, ask questions politely and avoid making assumptions about the way people should or will behave.

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The Week in Germany: The Ball Is in Your Court

Photo copyright dpa

Photo copyright dpa

This week the ball is in your court: Your faithful YG Editor is off on vacation and won’t be around to comb the blogs for the most interesting Germany-related posts to share here.  Instead, I hoped that you all might tell me what the week’s best was: Just add a link in the comments if you’ve read an interesting blog or news post about Germany this week.  I look forward to catching up with them all when I get back.  And have a great weekend!

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